Welcome To Eyeworld Vision Center

Color vision deficiency is the inability to distinguish certain shades of color or in more severe cases, see colors at all. The term "color blindness" is also used to describe this visual condition, but very few people are completely color blind.

Most people with color vision deficiency can see colors, but they have difficulty differentiating between

  • particular shades of reds and greens (most common) or
  • blues and yellows (less common).

People who are totally color blind, a condition called achromatopsia, can only see things as black and white or in shades of gray.

The severity of color vision deficiency can range from mild to severe depending on the cause. It will affect both eyes if it is inherited and usually just one if the cause for the deficiency is injury or illness.

Color vision is possible due to photoreceptors in the retina of the eye known as cones. These cones have light sensitive pigments that enable us to recognize color. Found in the macula, the central portion of the retina, each cone is sensitive to either red, green or blue light, which the cones recognize based upon light wavelengths.

Normally, the pigments inside the cones register differing colors and send that information through the optic nerve to the brain enabling you to distinguish countless shades of color. But if the cones lack one or more light sensitive pigments, you will be unable to see one or more of the three primary colors thereby causing a deficiency in your color perception.

The most common form of color deficiency is red-green. This does not mean that people with this deficiency cannot see these colors at all; they simply have a harder time differentiating between them. The difficulty they have in correctly identifying them depends on how dark or light the colors are.

Another form of color deficiency is blue-yellow. This is a rarer and more severe form of color vision loss than red-green since persons with blue-yellow deficiency frequently have red-green blindness too. In both cases, it is common for people with color vision deficiency to see neutral or gray areas where a particular color should appear.

There is no cure for inherited color deficiency. But if the cause is an illness or eye injury, treating these conditions may improve color vision.

Using special tinted eyeglasses or wearing a red tinted contact lens on one eye can increase some people's ability to differentiate between colors, though nothing can make you truly see the deficient color.

Most color deficient persons compensate for their inability to distinguish certain colors with color cues and details that are not consciously evident to people with normal color vision. There are ways to work around the inability to see certain colors by:


  • Organizing and labeling clothing, furniture or other colored objects (with the help of friends or family) for ease of recognition.

  • Remembering the order of things rather than their color can also increase the chances of correctly identifying colors. For example a traffic light has red on top, yellow in the middle and green on the bottom.

Though color vision deficiency can be a frustration and may limit participation in some occupations, in most cases it is not a serious threat to vision and can be adapted to your lifestyle with time, patience and practice.

 

Celebrating 25 years. Thank You!

To all of our loyal supporters:

In 2010 we will celebrate our 25th year serving the eye care needs of South Alabama.
I think back to our early days, (1985 in Chickasaw) and I’m astonished at your level of support
throughout the years. Thank you! 

We’re fully aware that our accomplishments are not simply attributable to good management
or hard-working employees. We grew and prospered with God’s Blessing and because we
found some great friends like you who gave us loyal support along the way. We want to let
you know how much we appreciate you continuing to rely on our office for your vision care
needs.

So this is a thank-you note—for allowing us to care for your vision needs, for putting up with
occasional errors due to “growing pains,” and just for helping to put Eyeworld Vision Center
on the map. The future looks bright, and we want to acknowledge your contribution to this
rosy outlook. As we say in Alabama, “’Preciate it!”

Phil and Sherry Gillette

Eye Examination 2 Pair Glasses
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Locations

EYEWORLD VISION CENTER

1088 Industrial Parkway I-65 Exit 13 Across From Wal-Mart.

Phone 251-675-3666 Fax 251-675-9366 Toll Free 1-800-453-0912

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7930 Moffett Rd. 1 Block West of Schillinger Rd. Across From WalMart

Phone 251-645-2991 Fax 251-645-0723